Project


Innovative living and care arrangements for people with dementia – population preferences in areas with ageing population

About 50 million people are affected by dementia Worldwide. Annually there are almost 10 million new cases. In Germany demographic change is likely to increase the number of persons with dementia by approximately 50% between 2007 and 2030. Currently, a large part of the persons with dementia in Germany are cared for at home. However, under the assumption of constant incidence and prevalence rates, demographic change and changes in traditional living arrangements will lead to a growing number of elderly persons living without familial support. These developments will pose an enormous challenge on the future organization of dementia care. In order to relieve the social security system, innovative care concepts are needed.

The aim of this project is to evaluate alternative concepts of living arrangements, and to examine preferences in the population aged 50 and over in urban and rural areas. The project aims to answer four interrelated research questions:

(1) Which concepts of living arrangements for people with medium forms of dementia do exist?

(2) What are the preferences for living and care arrangements in the case of dementia in the general population aged 50 and over in urban and rural regions with ageing populations?

(3) Are there different preferences between culturally diverse communities?

(4) Which obstacles are perceived by stakeholders in terms of the implementation of preferred living arrangements?

We examine these research questions using a combination of methods including health technology assessment, focus groups, expert interviews with relevant stakeholders, and a discrete choice experiment (DCE).

Researcher in charge
Jürgen Wasem

Jürgen Wasem

Board Member


+49 (201) 183 4283

Researcher

Silke Neusser

Silke Neusser

Researcher


+49 (201) 183 3158

Christian Speckemeier

Christian Speckemeier

Doctoral Student


+49 (201) 183 3885

Anke Walendzik

Anke Walendzik

Researcher


+49 (201) 183 4545